ADHD Coaching for Teens

The teen years are an exciting and challenging time of rapid growth and development. Peers become more important, parents gradually less so, sometimes leading to tension in the family. Demands and expectations rise, and the symptoms of ADHD and executive functioning issues may pose increasing challenges.

Working with a professional ADHD Coach is having a partner to provide structure, encouragement, and strategies to help you learn how to achieve your goals and achieve success. A coach can step in without the attachment of a parent and work with a teen to develop the skills and strategies that support the development of problem-solving skills, responsibility and positive forward movement.

An ADHD coach is similar to a sports coach in some ways—encouraging you and exploring strategies that work for you. But, it’s also different in some ways. For one, I do not yell or blow a whistle! And I am not upset if something does not go as planned. Instead, I help you get back on track and go for your own personal “gold” again.

As your partner, I help you identify what you want to achieve, and what you need to do to succeed. I help you identify goals as well as the steps to get there. Then you decide how you want to be held accountable for the actions that will move you toward your goals.

Teens can work directly with me on challenges they face managing (and balancing) school, work, extracurricular activities, family life, personal health and wellness, and relationships.

Interested? Want to learn more? Think coaching might be right for you?

It’s important for parents and teens to talk together about coaching. Parents may initially see the benefits while teens may be skeptical, or the other way around!

Here’s what you can do now:


Testimonials

My daughter has blossomed under Liz Ahmann’s ADHD coaching. Liz has been a great help to her in many areas, but most of all she has given her the reassurance that she is wonderful just the way she is!

Carol H., Maryland Mother of a 6th grader

Working with Liz Ahmann, my son has definitely made great strides in keeping on top of his work. Now at 10 p.m. I hear ‘Oh, I don’t have much to do!’ rather than ‘Aagh! I hate the world!’

Katherine A., Washington D.C. Mother of a 12th grader